Legalization-advocacy groups

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There are many legalization-advocacy organizations out there. If you want things to change, these organizations need your continued support. I particularly like the following:

Global Commission on Drug Policy

The Global Commission on Drug Policy is a group of high-profile world leaders which includes former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan and past presidents of Mexico, Brazil and Colombia, Chile, Poland, Greece and Sapin. Calling the global war on drugs a costly failure, the Global Commission on Drug Policy  is urging the Obama administration and other governments to end “the criminalization, marginalization and stigmatization of people who use drugs but do no harm to others.” The report by the Global Commission on Drug Policy, recommends that governments try new ways of legalizing and regulating drugs, especially marijuana, as a way to deny profits to drug cartels.
http://www.globalcommissionondrugs.org/wp-content/themes/gcdp_v1/pdf/Global_Commission_Report_English.pdf

The International Drug Policy Consortium (IDPC)

The International Drug Policy Consortium (IDPC) is a global network of 90 NGOs and professional networks that specialise in issues related to the production and use of controlled drugs. The Consortium aims to promote objective and open debate on the effectiveness, direction and content of drug policies at the national and international level, and supports evidence-based policies that are effective in reducing drug-related harm.

http://www.idpc.net

Law Enforcement Against Prohibition
Law Enforcement Against Prohibition is an international organization of criminal justice professionals who bear personal witness to the wasteful futility and harms of our current drug policies. Our experience on the front lines of the “war on drugs” has led us to call for a repeal of prohibition and its replacement with a tight system of legalized regulation, which will effectively cripple the violent cartels and street dealers who control the current illegal market.
http://www.leap.cc/

The Drug Policy Alliance (DPA)

The Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) is the nation’s leading organization promoting alternatives to current drug policy that are grounded in science, compassion, health and human rights.

http://www.beckleyfoundation.org

To support a scientific approach to drug policy, please see the Beckley Foundation. The Beckley foundation opened a Guatemala office on July 3rd with the active support of President Otto Perez Molina.

National Organization to Reform Marijuana Laws (NORML)

NORML’s mission is to move public opinion sufficiently to achieve the repeal of marijuana prohibition so that the responsible use of cannabis by adults is no longer subject to penalty.

http://norml.org/

Marijuana Policy Project

MPP and MPP Foundation envision a nation where marijuana is legally regulated similarly to alcohol, marijuana education is honest and realistic, and treatment for problem marijuana users is non-coercive and geared toward reducing harm.

http://www.mpp.org/

http://www.drugpolicy.org

http://www.talkingdrugs.org TalkingDrugs is a space for sharing stories about drugs

http://reformdrugpolicy.com/ The War on Drugs has failed.
It is time for politicians and the public to press for urgent policy reform.

The Global Initiative for Drug Policy Reform was launched at the House of Lords on 17.11.2011.
The aim of the initiative is to bring together : a) countries interested in reform; b) countries who have successfully implemented alternative drug control strategies; and c) the Global Commission on Drug Policy, in order to discuss new evidence and reports, towards the goal of reforming global drug policy, including amendments to the UN Conventions.

Improving our drug policies is one of the key policy challenges of our time.
The taboo on debate must end.
It is time for reform.

http://www.csdp.org Common Sense for Drug Policy Common Sense for Drug Policy is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to reforming drug policy and expanding harm reduction. CSDP disseminates factual information and comments on existing laws, policies and practices.

CSDP provides advice and assistance to individuals and organizations and facilitates coalition building. CSDP supports syringe exchanges, the expansion of Methadone and Buprenorphine availability and other public health measures to reduce harm to users and restrict the spread of HIV / AIDS and Hepatitis C. CSDP advocates the regulation and control of marijuana in a manner similar to alcohol and subject to local option. CSDP favors decriminalizing the use of hard drugs and providing them only through prescription. CSDP also advocates clear federal guidelines for the practice of pain management so that physicians need not fear unwarranted law enforcement scrutiny of medical practices.
http://stopthedrugwar.org/ StoptheDrugWar.org (DRCNet) calls for an end to drug prohibition (e.g. some form of legalization), and its replacement with some sensible framework in which drugs can be regulated and controlled instead.

http://www.cupihd.org El Colectivo por una Política Integral hacia las Drogas AC es una organización de la sociedad civil dedicada a la investigación, la educación, la acción y la difusión orientadas a transformar la cultura y las políticas de drogas bajo un enfoque de reducción de riesgos, multidisciplinario, integral, basado en evidencia, científico y de respeto a los derechos humanos.

 

http://www.tni.org/drugs

http://www.ihra.net

http://www.countthecosts.org

http://www.intercambios.org.ar

http://www.wola.org/program/drug_policy

http://www.comunidadesegura.org

http://www.soros.org/about/programs/global-drug-policy-program

There are countless more advocacy groups working all over the world. Please feel free to add the links to your favorite advocacy group in the comment section below.

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4 Responses to Legalization-advocacy groups

  1. As more politicians are being charged and admit to substance abuse, the global society may begin to recognize the need for a concerted effort to reverse the global drug cataclysm. Corruption, violence, unintentional deaths, along with massive incarcerations, remain the daily by-products of the illicit drug trade, and the fruitless “war on drugs”. Now, more than any other time in my life, evolving attitudes are encouraging. Keep up the great work, and continue to fight the really good fight!!

  2. Hi please check out The Drug User Rights Action Network blog. If drugs are legalized the users need to be an integral part of the process or there will be more opportunities to abuse us.

    • admin says:

      Why the War on Drugs Should Be Ended
      by Laurence M. Vance

      http://www.fff.org/comment/com1207h.asp

      The War on Drugs is a monstrous evil that has ruined more lives than drugs themselves. Taking drugs harms the person who partakes, but not those who abstain; the War on Drugs harms everyone, even those who abstain from taking drugs.

      Yet the Drug War enjoys bipartisan support in Congress, is supported by the majority of Americans, is cheered by most religious people, is espoused by most parents with young children, is championed by liberals and conservatives alike, is encouraged by the majority of law-enforcement personnel, and is even defended by those who say they advocate “civil liberties” or “limited government.”

      But drugs are addictive. Yes, and so is caffeine.

      But drugs are unhealthy. Yes, and so is high-fructose corn syrup.

      But drugs are dangerous. Yes, and so is skateboarding.

      But drugs are sinful. Yes, and so is adultery.

      But drugs are a bad habit. Yes, and so is burping in public.

      But drugs can be destructive. Yes, and so can tobacco smoking.

      But drugs are a vice. Yes, and so is gluttony.

      But drugs are immoral. Yes, and so is pornography.

      But drugs harm children. Yes, and so does divorce.

      But drugs may lead to premature death. Yes, and so may alcohol.

      But drugs have societal costs. Yes, and so does obesity.

      But drugs can lead to financial ruin. Yes, and so can using credit cards.

      But drugs can kill. Yes, and so can prescription drugs.

      But drugs can have unintended consequences. Yes, and so can sexual relations.

      But drugs can lead to crime to support one’s habit. Yes, and so can gambling.

      But drugs have no redeeming value. Yes, and neither do Twinkies.

      Why, then, do so many people support the War on Drugs? The main problem, I believe, is too little commitment to freedom and, concomitantly, too much faith in government. Americans who are not firmly committed to the freedom philosophy intuitively believe that when there is a problem, government action is the best or the only way to solve it.

      In spite of all the evidence of the failures and destructiveness of the Drug War, drug warriors are intransigent when it comes to ending the Drug War.

      Why should the Drug War be ended?

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it has failed to prevent drug abuse.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because marijuana has been found to have medical benefits.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because more people are killed by tobacco every year than are killed by all illegal drugs in the 20th century.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because smoking marijuana is less dangerous than drinking alcohol.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it violates the Constitution.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because the D.A.R.E program has had, according to the GAO, “no statistically long-term effect on preventing youth illicit drug use.”

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because more people die from drugs prescribed and administered by physicians than from illegal drugs.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it clogs the judicial system with noncrimes.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it swells the prison population with nonviolent offenders.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it has failed to keep drugs away from teenagers.

      The War on Drugs should not be ended not simply because it has lasted for more than 40 years with nothing lasting to show for it.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because other countries have legalized drugs with no increase in drug overdoses.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it hinders legitimate pain management and turns doctors into criminals.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it has failed to keep drugs out of the hands of addicts or to get them treatment.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because of its gross sentencing disparities.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because for the first half of our nation’s history there were no prohibitions against any drug.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it has made criminals out of hundreds of thousands of otherwise law-abiding Americans.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it has devastated the black community.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because, according to a study published in the prestigious medical journal The Lancet, alcohol ranks as the “most harmful drug,” beating out heroin, crack cocaine, and ecstasy.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it has failed to stop the violence associated with drug trafficking.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it has cost U.S. taxpayers billions of dollars.

      The War on Drugs should be ended simply because there are many more activities that are much more dangerous than using drugs.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it corrupts law enforcement.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it is a war on a victimless crime.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because it has failed to reduce the demand for illicit drugs.

      The War on Drugs should be ended not simply because its costs far exceed its benefits.

      The War on Drugs should be ended because it is a war on the Constitution, federalism, and limited government. It is a war on personal responsibility and accountability. It is a war on individual liberty and private property. It is a war on personal and financial privacy. It is a war on peaceful activity and the right to be left alone if one is not aggressing against the person or property of another.

      The War on Drugs should be ended, not gradually or partially, but immediately and completely. All drugs laws should be repealed. All prisoners incarcerated for drug possession should be released. All government agencies fighting the Drug War should be abolished.

      If doesn’t matter if all the bad things said about drugs are true. It doesn’t matter if drugs are sinful and immoral. It doesn’t matter if drugs are unhealthy and dangerous. It doesn’t matter if drugs are inherently addictive. It doesn’t matter if drug use leads to crime to support one’s habit. It doesn’t matter if drugs destroy homes and lives.

      It doesn’t matter if marijuana is a gateway drug. It doesn’t matter if marijuana isn’t beneficial for pain management.

      It doesn’t matter if someone you know died from a drug overdose. It doesn’t matter if your kids are on drugs. It doesn’t matter if you know someone who had a crack baby.

      It doesn’t matter if all the supposed negative effects of ending the Drug War actually do come to pass. It doesn’t matter if millions more people would try drugs if they were legal. It doesn’t matter if drug overdoses would increase. It doesn’t matter if more people would become addicted to drugs. It doesn’t matter if drugs would become cheaper and more readily available.

      It doesn’t matter if the Drug War can be “won.” It doesn’t matter if drug warriors have good intentions. It doesn’t matter if some good might come from the Drug War. It doesn’t matter if kids just say no to drugs. It doesn’t matter if drug addicts get treatment. It doesn’t matter if drug use among teens declines. It doesn’t matter if demand for drugs shrinks.

      It doesn’t matter if the Drug War enjoys widespread bipartisan support. It doesn’t matter if the majority of Americans back the Drug War. It doesn’t matter if other countries believe in fighting the Drug War. It doesn’t matter if physicians, psychiatrists, police, and social workers defend the Drug War.

      It doesn’t matter if advocates for medical marijuana just want to smoke pot for recreational purposes. It doesn’t matter if proponents of drug decriminalization just want to get high. It doesn’t matter if those who favor the legalization of drugs just want to get stoned out of their mind.

      The War on Drugs should be ended because it is not really about drugs at all. It is about expanding the power and scope of the state. It is about politicians, bureaucrats, regulators, statists, nannies, and busybodies who tell Americans what they may and may not put into their mouths, noses, lungs, and veins.

      The War on Drugs should be ended because it is a war on the free market, a free society, and freedom itself.

      Laurence M. Vance is a policy advisor for the Future of Freedom Foundation and the author of The Revolution That Wasn’t. Visit his website: http://www.vancepublications.com. Send him email.

  3. Steele Smith says:

    Perhaps we could do a web link exchange with
    http://www.ASANational.Org
    Please let me know.
    Thank you,
    Steele Smith
    714-865-5300

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